Ponder The Universe

"We are the way for the Cosmos to know itself" - Carl Sagan

we-are-star-stuff:

holymoleculesbatman:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY STEPHEN HAWKING!

This genius was born on January 8th, 1942 in Oxford (England). He is a theoretical physicistcosmologist, and author. Among his significant scientific works have been a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularities theorems in the framework of general relativity, and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set forth a cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics.

Stephen Hawking has made unimaginably important contributions to some of our current understandings of science. He has answered Einstein’s unified field theory which has led to a better understanding of the conditions that were present at the beginning of the universe as well as the physical laws of nature. He developed research on black holes no one else has and has made it possible for others to obtain more information on the subject after he passes on. He has pushed forth into outer space in hopes of finding somewhere else where humans can live in case of a disaster. His discoveries have led to new possibilities of how we understand things and how we can develop new ideas. Without Mr. Hawking, many things we know today could possibly have never happened.

spaceplasma:

NGC 6188 and NGC 6164 Nebulae 
The emission nebula is found near the edge of a large molecular cloud, unseen at visible wavelengths, in the southern constellation Ara, about 4,000 light-years away. Massive, young stars of the embedded Ara OB1 association were formed in that region only a few million years ago, sculpting the dark shapes and powering the nebular glow with stellar winds and intense ultraviolet radiation. The recent star formation itself was likely triggered by winds and supernova explosions, from previous generations of massive stars, that swept up and compressed the molecular gas. Joining NGC 6188 on this cosmic canvas is rare emission nebula NGC 6164, also created by one of the region’s massive O-type stars.

spaceplasma:

NGC 6188 and NGC 6164 Nebulae

The emission nebula is found near the edge of a large molecular cloud, unseen at visible wavelengths, in the southern constellation Ara, about 4,000 light-years away.

Massive, young stars of the embedded Ara OB1 association were formed in that region only a few million years ago, sculpting the dark shapes and powering the nebular glow with stellar winds and intense ultraviolet radiation.

The recent star formation itself was likely triggered by winds and supernova explosions, from previous generations of massive stars, that swept up and compressed the molecular gas.

Joining NGC 6188 on this cosmic canvas is rare emission nebula NGC 6164, also created by one of the region’s massive O-type stars.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

Clouds in Cygnus 
Cosmic clouds of gas and dust drift across this magnificent mosaic covering a 12x12 degree field within the high flying constellation Cygnus. The collaborative skyscape, a combination of broad and narrow band image data presented in the Hubble palette, is anchored by bright, hot, supergiant star Deneb, below center near the left edge. Alpha star of Cygnus, Deneb, is the top of the Northern Cross asterism and is seen here next to the dark void known as the Northern Coal Sack. Below Deneb are the recognizable North America and Pelican nebulae (NGC 7000 and IC 5070). Another supergiant star, Sadr (Gamma Cygni) is near the center of the field just above the bright wings of the Butterfly Nebula. A line continuing up and right will encounter the more compact Crescent Nebula and finally the Tulip Nebula near the top of the frame. Most of these complex nebulosities are located about 2,000 light-years away. Along with the Sun, they lie in the Orion spiral arm of our Milky Way galaxy.
Credit: Bob Caton, Al Howard, Eric Zbinden, Rogelio Bernal Andreo

Clouds in Cygnus 

Cosmic clouds of gas and dust drift across this magnificent mosaic covering a 12x12 degree field within the high flying constellation Cygnus. The collaborative skyscape, a combination of broad and narrow band image data presented in the Hubble palette, is anchored by bright, hot, supergiant star Deneb, below center near the left edge. Alpha star of Cygnus, Deneb, is the top of the Northern Cross asterism and is seen here next to the dark void known as the Northern Coal Sack. Below Deneb are the recognizable North America and Pelican nebulae (NGC 7000 and IC 5070). Another supergiant star, Sadr (Gamma Cygni) is near the center of the field just above the bright wings of the Butterfly Nebula. A line continuing up and right will encounter the more compact Crescent Nebula and finally the Tulip Nebula near the top of the frame. Most of these complex nebulosities are located about 2,000 light-years away. Along with the Sun, they lie in the Orion spiral arm of our Milky Way galaxy.

Credit: Bob Caton, Al Howard, Eric Zbinden, Rogelio Bernal Andreo

we-are-star-stuff:

The Carina Nebula is an immense landscape of dark dust columns silhouetted against glowing gas clouds, which lies about 7500 light-years away. The nebula, almost 500 trillion kilometres wide, is both lit and sculpted by the intense radiation of its brilliant young stars.

we-are-star-stuff:

The Carina Nebula is an immense landscape of dark dust columns silhouetted against glowing gas clouds, which lies about 7500 light-years away. The nebula, almost 500 trillion kilometres wide, is both lit and sculpted by the intense radiation of its brilliant young stars.

n-a-s-a:

The ISAAC infrared images of Messier 16
Credit: ESO/M.McCaughrean & M.Andersen (AIP) 

n-a-s-a:

The ISAAC infrared images of Messier 16

Credit: ESO/M.McCaughrean & M.Andersen (AIP) 
Leonids Over PyramidsCredit : Jamil Ghanayem

Leonids Over Pyramids

Credit : Jamil Ghanayem

n-a-s-a:

LMC Region near the Tarantula Nebula
Credit: ESO 

n-a-s-a:

LMC Region near the Tarantula Nebula

Credit: ESO 


NGC 6357: Cathedral to Massive Stars 
"How massive can a normal star be? Estimates made from distance, brightness and standard solar models had given one star in the open cluster Pismis 24 over 200 times the mass of our
Sun, nearly making it the record holder. This star is the brightest object located just above the gas front in the above image. Close inspection of images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, however, have shown that Pismis 24-1 derives its brilliant luminosity not from a single star but from three at least. Component stars would still remain near 100 solar masses, making them among the more massive stars currently on record. Toward the bottom of the image, stars are still forming in the associated emission nebula NGC 6357. Appearing perhaps like a Gothic cathedral, energetic stars near the center appear to be breaking out and illuminating a spectacular cocoon.”
Credit: NASA, ESA and Jesús Maíz Apellániz

NGC 6357: Cathedral to Massive Stars 

"How massive can a normal star be? Estimates made from distance, brightness and standard solar models had given one star in the open cluster Pismis 24 over 200 times the mass of our

Sun, nearly making it the record holder. This star is the brightest object located just above the gas front in the above image. Close inspection of images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, however, have shown that Pismis 24-1 derives its brilliant luminosity not from a single star but from three at least. Component stars would still remain near 100 solar masses, making them among the more massive stars currently on record. Toward the bottom of the image, stars are still forming in the associated emission nebula NGC 6357. Appearing perhaps like a Gothic cathedral, energetic stars near the center appear to be breaking out and illuminating a spectacular cocoon.”

Credit: NASA, ESA and Jesús Maíz Apellániz